100 Top Most Computer Terminology - ThulirKalvi

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Sunday, February 11, 2024

100 Top Most Computer Terminology

 100 top most computer terminology 

1. Algorithm: A set of instructions or rules designed to solve a specific problem or perform a task.

2. Binary: A numbering system based on two digits, 0 and 1, used by computers to represent data and perform calculations.

3. Cache: A high-speed storage mechanism used to temporarily store frequently accessed data for quicker retrieval.

4. Database: An organized collection of structured information, typically stored electronically in a computer system.

5. Ethernet: A common type of wired network technology used for local area networks (LANs).

6. Firewall: A security system designed to monitor and control incoming and outgoing network traffic based on predetermined security rules.

7. Gigabyte: A unit of digital information storage equal to 1,024 megabytes or approximately one billion bytes.

8. HTML (Hypertext Markup Language): The standard markup language used to create and design web pages.

9. Icon: A small graphical representation or symbol used to represent files, folders, or applications on a computer screen.

10. JavaScript: A versatile programming language commonly used to create interactive effects within web browsers.

11. Kernel: The core component of an operating system responsible for managing system resources and providing essential services.

12. LAN (Local Area Network): A network that connects computers and devices within a limited geographical area, such as a home, office, or campus.

13. Megabyte: A unit of digital information storage equal to 1,024 kilobytes or approximately one million bytes.

14. Network: A system of interconnected computers or devices that can communicate and share resources.

15. Operating System: Software that manages computer hardware and provides a user interface for interacting with the computer.

16. Protocol: A set of rules or standards governing communication between computers and devices on a network.

17. Queue: A data structure that follows the FIFO (First-In, First-Out) principle, where the first element added to the queue is the first to be removed.

18. Router: A networking device that forwards data packets between computer networks, typically using IP addresses.

19. Software: Programs and applications that run on a computer system, including operating systems, utilities, and applications.

20. Terabyte: A unit of digital information storage equal to 1,024 gigabytes or approximately one trillion bytes.

21. Unicode: A universal character encoding standard that assigns a unique numeric value to every character in most of the world's writing systems.

22. Virtual Memory: A memory management technique that uses disk space as an extension of RAM to temporarily store data when physical memory (RAM) is full.

23. WAN (Wide Area Network): A network that spans a large geographical area, typically connecting multiple LANs or other networks.

24. XML (eXtensible Markup Language): A markup language similar to HTML used for storing and transporting data in a structured format.

25. Zip file: A compressed file format used to reduce the size of one or more files for storage or transmission.

26. ARP (Address Resolution Protocol): A protocol used to map IP addresses to MAC addresses on a network.

27. BIOS (Basic Input/Output System): Firmware used to perform hardware initialization during the booting process and provide runtime services for operating systems and programs.

28. Cloud Computing: A model for delivering computing services over the internet, allowing users to access resources such as servers, storage, and applications on-demand.

29. Debugging: The process of identifying and fixing errors or bugs in software code to ensure it behaves as intended.


30. Encryption: The process of encoding data to make it unreadable without the proper decryption key, used to protect sensitive information during transmission or storage.

31. Floppy Disk: A magnetic storage device that was commonly used for data storage and transfer in the past, now largely obsolete.

32. GUI (Graphical User Interface): A visual interface that allows users to interact with computers and software using graphical elements such as windows, icons, and buttons.

33. Hashing: A process used to convert input data into a fixed-size string of characters, typically used in data storage, cryptography, and password verification.

34. Internet: A global network of interconnected computers and devices that use the TCP/IP protocol suite to communicate and share information.

35. Java: A high-level programming language commonly used for developing cross-platform applications and web-based software.

36. Keyboard: An input device used to enter text, commands, and other data into a computer system by pressing keys.

37. Linux: An open-source operating system kernel based on Unix, often used in servers, embedded systems, and as an alternative to Windows or macOS.

38. Malware: Malicious software designed to disrupt, damage, or gain unauthorized access to computer systems or data.

39. Network Interface Card (NIC): A hardware component that enables computers to connect to a network by providing a physical connection to the network media and implementing network protocols.

40. Open Source: Software whose source code is freely available and can be modified, redistributed, and used by anyone under licenses that adhere to the Open Source Definition.

41. Pixel: The smallest unit of a digital image, typically represented as a single point of light on a display screen.

42. Query: A request for information from a database or search engine, typically written in a specific query language such as SQL.

43. RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks): A data storage technology that combines multiple disk drives into a single logical unit to improve performance, reliability, or both.

44. Server: A computer or device that provides data, services, or resources to other computers or devices on a network, often referred to as clients.

45. TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol): The foundational protocols of the internet, responsible for establishing connections and transmitting data between devices on a network.

46. URL (Uniform Resource Locator): A web address that specifies the location of a resource on the internet, typically consisting of a protocol, domain name, and path.

47. Virus: Malicious software that can replicate itself and infect other files or systems, often causing damage or stealing information.

48. Wi-Fi: A wireless networking technology that allows devices to connect to a local area network (LAN) using radio waves, typically for internet access.

49. XSS (Cross-Site Scripting): A type of security vulnerability that allows attackers to inject malicious scripts into web pages viewed by other users.

50. Yottabyte: A unit of digital information storage equal to 1,024 zettabytes or approximately one septillion bytes.

51. API (Application Programming Interface): A set of rules and protocols that allows different software applications to communicate and share data with each other.

52. Byte: A unit of digital information storage equal to 8 bits, typically used to represent a single character or small amount of data.

53. CSS (Cascading Style Sheets): A style sheet language used to describe the presentation of a document written in HTML or XML, including aspects such as layout, colors, and fonts.

54. DNS (Domain Name System): A hierarchical naming system used to translate human-readable domain names into numerical IP addresses, enabling devices to locate resources on the internet.

55.


Ethernet Cable: A type of network cable used to connect devices to a local area network (LAN) or Ethernet network.

56. Firewall: A security system designed to monitor and control incoming and outgoing network traffic based on predetermined security rules.

57. Graphics Card: A hardware component responsible for rendering images and graphics on a computer display, commonly used in gaming and multimedia applications.

58. Hyperlink: A clickable element in a document or web page that links to another location or resource, typically indicated by colored or underlined text.

59. IP Address: A numerical label assigned to each device connected to a computer network that uses the Internet Protocol for communication.

60. JavaScript: A versatile programming language commonly used to create interactive effects within web browsers.

61. Kernel: The core component of an operating system responsible for managing system resources and providing essential services.

62. LAN (Local Area Network): A network that connects computers and devices within a limited geographical area, such as a home, office, or campus.

63. Megabyte: A unit of digital information storage equal to 1,024 kilobytes or approximately one million bytes.

64. Network: A system of interconnected computers or devices that can communicate and share resources.

65. Operating System: Software that manages computer hardware and provides a user interface for interacting with the computer.

66. Protocol: A set of rules or standards governing communication between computers and devices on a network.

67. Queue: A data structure that follows the FIFO (First-In, First-Out) principle, where the first element added to the queue is the first to be removed.

68. Router: A networking device that forwards data packets between computer networks, typically using IP addresses.

69. Software: Programs and applications that run on a computer system, including operating systems, utilities, and applications.

70. Terabyte: A unit of digital information storage equal to 1,024 gigabytes or approximately one trillion bytes.

71. Unicode: A universal character encoding standard that assigns a unique numeric value to every character in most of the world's writing systems.

72. Virtual Memory: A memory management technique that uses disk space as an extension of RAM to temporarily store data when physical memory (RAM) is full.

73. WAN (Wide Area Network): A network that spans a large geographical area, typically connecting multiple LANs or other networks.

74. XML (eXtensible Markup Language): A markup language similar to HTML used for storing and transporting data in a structured format.

75. Zip file: A compressed file format used to reduce the size of one or more files for storage or transmission.

76. ARP (Address Resolution Protocol): A protocol used to map IP addresses to MAC addresses on a network.

77. BIOS (Basic Input/Output System): Firmware used to perform hardware initialization during the booting process and provide runtime services for operating systems and programs.

78. Cloud Computing: A model for delivering computing services over the internet, allowing users to access resources such as servers, storage, and applications on-demand.

79. Debugging: The process of identifying and fixing errors or bugs in software code to ensure it behaves as intended.

80. Encryption: The process of encoding data to make it unreadable without the proper decryption key, used to protect sensitive information during transmission or storage.

81. Floppy Disk: A magnetic storage device that was commonly used for data storage and transfer in the past, now largely obsolete.

82. GUI (Graphical User Interface): A visual interface that allows users to interact with computers and software using graphical elements such as windows, icons, and buttons.


83. Hashing: A process used to convert input data into a fixed-size string of characters, typically used in data storage, cryptography, and password verification.

84. Internet: A global network of interconnected computers and devices that use the TCP/IP protocol suite to communicate and share information.

85. Java: A high-level programming language commonly used for developing cross-platform applications and web-based software.

86. Keyboard: An input device used to enter text, commands, and other data into a computer system by pressing keys.

87. Linux: An open-source operating system kernel based on Unix, often used in servers, embedded systems, and as an alternative to Windows or macOS.

88. Malware: Malicious software designed to disrupt, damage, or gain unauthorized access to computer systems or data.

89. Network Interface Card (NIC): A hardware component that enables computers to connect to a network by providing a physical connection to the network media and implementing network protocols.

90. Open Source: Software whose source code is freely available and can be modified, redistributed, and used by anyone under licenses that adhere to the Open Source Definition.

91. Pixel: The smallest unit of a digital image, typically represented as a single point of light on a display screen.

92. Query: A request for information from a database or search engine, typically written in a specific query language such as SQL.

93. RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks): A data storage technology that combines multiple disk drives into a single logical unit to improve performance, reliability, or both.

94. Server: A computer or device that provides data, services, or resources to other computers or devices on a network, often referred to as clients.

95. TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol): The foundational protocols of the internet, responsible for establishing connections and transmitting data between devices on a network.

96. URL (Uniform Resource Locator): A web address that specifies the location of a resource on the internet, typically consisting of a protocol, domain name, and path.

97. Virus: Malicious software that can replicate itself and infect other files or systems, often causing damage or stealing information.

98. Wi-Fi: A wireless networking technology that allows devices to connect to a local area network (LAN) using radio waves, typically for internet access.

99. XSS (Cross-Site Scripting): A type of security vulnerability that allows attackers to inject malicious scripts into web pages viewed by other users.

100. Yottabyte: A unit of digital information storage equal to 1,024 zettabytes or approximately one septillion bytes.

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